Judo

Idrottsgården is a multipurpose sports hall located in central Mariehamn beside Idrottsparken. There is an existing judo hall but the judo competition will be held in a larger hall measuring 18 x 32 metres, which is located on the first floor.

In addition to the judo hall Idrottsgården contains an 8-lane bowling alley, weightlifting/fitness facilities, a conference room, two large changing rooms, 4 smaller changing rooms and cafeteria.

Idrottsgården is the home to Åland’s Judo Club, which has 130 members the majority of whom are juniors. There are about 20 senior members including Samuel Mäki who is a member of the Finnish Olympic Team and hoping to compete in the 2008 Games. Åland judokas won a bronze and 2 gold medals at the 2007 Finnish Championships.

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Åland’s Judo Club has vast experience in organising competitions.

Gymnastics

Gymnastics on Åland is organised by Mariehamn’s Gymnastic Association, which has 350 active members. Nearly 200 juniors train in apparatus gymnastics and 50 girls and 10 boys
of these are taking part in various competitions.

The Gymnastic Assoc. has a vast experience in organising competitions and hosted a national competition with 200 entries in April 2007.

Golf

Ålands Golfklubb, which was founded in 1983, is situated approx. 25 minutes by car from Mariehamn.

There are two 18-hole courses. The 5575 metres, par 71, Slottsbanan (Castle Course) and the 5600 metres, par 70, Kungsbanan (Kings Course).

There is a clubhouse with a restaurant and a modern service-house containing an office, pro-shop, changing rooms and a sauna. There is a practice area for chipping and bunker shots and two putting greens.

Ålands Golfklubb is, with approx 25,000 guests annually, one of the most visited clubs in the Baltic region. The club has successfully organised a number of large competitions including the 2004 Finnish Championships.

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Badminton

BK Smash is the only badminton club on Åland.

At present about 200 people play badminton and of these 40 are juniors who train regularly.

No large badminton competitions have been arranged on Åland since the 1991 Island Games but having entered the badminton competition at a number of Games there is a wealth of experience available

Archery

Backeberg Sportsground, which is situated in the north of Mariehamn, will be the venue for the archery competition. The original venue at Baltichallen has been changed due to the imense interest in the football competition and the need to increase the number of football pitches available within Mariehamn. The archery area, which is protected from wind on two sides, (south and east) measures 100m x 150m. Spectators will have a good view of the competition area and hopefully the wind protection will help create a successful compettition with high scores.

Mariehamn Archery Club is the only archery club on the island. The club, which has a small but very active membership, hosted the archery competition in the 1991 Island Games. Recurve is the discipline favoured by most of the members.

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Snow Storm part 2

Turner was very vexed by reading a criticism of this work that it represents a mass of `soapsuds and whitewash’, and was overheard to say· `soapsuds and whitewash! What would they have? I wonder what they think the sea’s like? I wish they’d been in it.’ But today it is easier to appreciate that his freedom of handling imparts the raw energy of a storm far more authentically than if he had painted even’ drop of rain or every wave in the sea with greater degrees of verisimilitude.

The painting above is the central detail not from the Turner Snow Storm but from my attempt for demonstration purposes. Note I bent the mask even more than Turner’s. I also put Turner tied to the mask, as he was said to have been!

Snowstorm: Hannibal and his Army Crossing the Alps. was the first picture with which Turner printed lines of poetry in the catalogue with a credit to an ‚MS’ poems ‚Fallacies of Hope’.

Turner’s pictures were becoming arranged, compositionally, around ‚vortexes’, in which the picture emanates from a central structure in a series of sweeps, as above for example. He also experimented with new forms, such as squares and octagons. His was always a deliberate in development. The painting reveals the extent to which Turner sees the style of the brushwork itself as a factor of the impact of the painting.

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Snow Storm

This is perhaps Turner’s finest seascape, and indeed possibly the greatest depiction of a storm in all art. It was exhibited at the Royal Academy in I842. Turner once claimed that in order to paint this scene he had `got the sailors to lash me to the mast to observe it; I was lashed for four hours, and I did not expect to escape, but I felt bound to record it if I did’. However, possibly he fabricated this story, for it is similar to one told of the marine painter Joseph Vernet, and no ship named the Ariel is known to have sailed from Harwich in the years leading up to I842; perhaps the title of the vessel was intended to allude to Shakespeare’s The Tempest. Nor does the picture-title accord fully with what we actually see, for the ship is `going by the lead’, which denotes that a weighted line is being periodically dropped from the bow to gauge the shallowness of the waters so as to prevent the ship from running aground. Yet such a prudent, measured precaution seems to be at odds with the actual predicament of a vessel caught up in a maelstrom, even if we can appreciate why the boat should be firing signal rockets to denote her position offshore.
Yet even if some or all of Turner’s factual claims are false, and there seems to be some disparity between the nautical behavior indicated in the title and what appears to be actually happening to the Ariel, the veracity of Turner’s communication of what it is like to be at the centre of a cataclysmic storm is beyond dispute, with the entire visible universe wheeling in a massive vortex around both the steamer and also the spectator. (And on the steamer, incidentally, we can see that its foremast and funnel are located in the correct positions, which again indicates that Turner had purposefully taken liberties with literal reality in The Fighting Temeraire of three years earlier.)

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J.M.W.Turner – Rain, Steam, and Speed

The scene is fairly certainly identifiable as Maidenhead railway bridge, which spans the Thames between Taplow and Maidenhead. The bridge, designed by the engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel and completed in 1839, has two main arches of brick, very wide and flat. The view is to the east, towards London.

On the left people are boating on the river, while to the right a ploughman works on a field. The tranquility of these traditional activities contrasts with the steam train rushing towards the viewer, the stark outline of its black funnel clearly visible. In front of the train a hare, one of the speediest of animals, dashes for cover.

Turner’s picture can be associated with the ‚railway mania’ which swept across England in the 1840s. It is also an outstanding example of his late style of painting. Sky and river landscape are dissolved in a haze of freely applied oil paint, to give a striking impression of the contrasting movement of driving rain and speeding train.

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Dido building Carthage part 3

Punic Wars, Three major wars between Rome and Carthage resulting in the subjugation of Carthage and Rome’s acquisition of territories beyond the Italian Peninsula.1. First war (264-241 BC) was probably brought on by the desire for military aggrandizement by the Roman nobiles. Its immediate cause was a conflict between the Mamertini and forces from Syracuse, on Sicily. Both Carthage and Rome responded to the Mamertini request for aid, and soon after were at war with one another. The Romans built a great fleet, defeated the Carthaginians at the Battle of Mylae (260), and launched an ill-fated invasion of Africa in which the commander, Regulus, was captured (255) by Greek mercenaries. On Sicily, the Carthaginian commander Hamilcar Barca succeeded in thwarting the Romans’ attempt at decisive victory. However, the Roman fleet finally destroyed the Carthaginian fleet in the naval battle of Aegates (241) and thereby forced the Carthaginians to accept peace. Rome gained Carthaginian territories on Sicily. Not long after, Rome also annexed Sardinia and Corsica. 2. Second War (218-201 BC) between Rome and Carthage, sparked by the Carthaginians’ conquest of Saguntum, a Spanish city loosely associated with Rome. In the years after the first war, Carthage had greatly expanded its holdings in Spain. With the outbreak of war, the great Carthaginian general Hannibal led his forces on the now famous march from Spain, across the Alps, and into north Italy. He won notable victories at Ticinus (218), Trebia (218), Lake Trasimenus (217) and Cannae (216), but failed to take Rome itself. Although Hannibal gained control of much of southern Italy, Carthage failed to provide him needed support. Finally, the Roman invasion of North Africa by Scipio Africanus Major (204) forced Hannibal to return to Carthage. He was defeated at the Battle of Zama (202), and Carthage itself fell (201). Carthage had to give up its navy and its Spanish territories and never again seriously threatened Roman military superiority. 3. Third War (149-146 BC) between Rome and Carthage, resulting from Roman fears about a resurgent Carthage and efforts by the Roman, Cato the Elder, to bring about the complete destruction of Carthage. Rome finally declared war and soon after laid siege to Carthage. The Carthaginians refused to surrender, and the Romans, led by Scipio Africanus Minor, were forced to fight in the streets of the city to gain control of it. They then completely destroyed Carthage and organized Carthaginian domains into the Roman province of Africa.

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Dido building Carthage part 2

Carthage lay on a bay. Its Phoenician settlers were seafarers and traders. Aided by slave labor they built wharves, markets, and factories. Carthage grew rich and strong, with colonies in North Africa, in Spain, and on the Mediterranean islands.

Powerful Rome, over a period of a hundred years, defeated Carthage in the Punic Wars. The first, fought in Sicily from 264 to 241 BC, cost Carthage Sicily and a large indemnity.

In the second Punic War, from 218 to 201 BC, the general Hannibal crossed Spain and southern France with his war elephants and climbed over the Alps, an almost unbelievable exploit, to defeat the Romans at Cannae. After he was recalled to Africa, he lost at Zama, and Carthage was forced to withdraw from Spain. (See also Hannibal.)

Rome won the third Punic War, fought from 149 to 146 BC, in spite of a heroic resistance in which Carthaginian women cut off their hair to provide bowstrings for the catapults. Carthage was burned.

The emperor Augustus later built a new city on the site. This became a Roman seat of government in Africa. When the Vandals overran the region, Carthage was made their capital. It was destroyed again after its capture in AD 647 by the Arabs.

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